Sunday, March 13, 2016

April Awareness Events for School Counselors, 2016

Sunday, March 13, 2016



Spring is almost here and with it comes a plethora of social awareness events for teens.  Although school is getting close to being over (can I get an amen) and summer is around the corner, I am sure you will agree that April awareness of these social issues can make May, June, and July safer for students.  Here are the events for April and some ideas. 

Alcohol Awareness Month

Alcohol Awareness Month Website

Alcohol Facts
  • Teens who start drinking before the age of 15 are five times more likely to be dependent on alcohol than those who started drinking at the age of 21.  Delaying consumption of alcohol can make a significant impact on alcohol dependence.
  • Out of teens surveyed in 2006, 7.2 million reported binge drinking and 2.4 million reported being heavy drinkers. Binge drinking (National Institute of Alcohol and Addition) is defined by drinking five or more drinks in a two hour period. In the blog post, Kids Don't Need to Practice Drinking for College, the author tackles the belief by parents that kids have to practice drinking for college.  Binge drinking does not start in college; however, it intensifies when parental boundaries are removed.
  • When teens drink, they tend to consume alcohol more intensely than adults. For example, teens will consume at least four to five drinks at one time (whoa!) compared to adults who tend to consume four to five within 2 hours when binge drinking.
  • Although teen drinking has decreased in recent years, binge drinking has increased among adolescents. In fact, teens are engaging in extreme binging or drinking up to ten or more drinks in a row. 
  •  Alcohol can cause alterations to the brain structure and function which may have effects into adulthood. An ABC News Report on Girl Binge Drinking describes the dangers of binge drinking on the female brain. Researchers found that girls who drink alcohol have more chances of experiencing brain damage than male teens.
- See more at: http://forhighschoolcounselors.blogspot.com/2015/03/extreme-teen-binge-drinking.html#sthash.ABQOgeeG.dpuf
Since 1987, the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence has sponsored Alcohol Awareness month.  This year's theme is centered around youth and the slogan is called "Talk Early, Talk Often: Parents Can Make a Difference in Teen Alcohol Use".  Check out the resources below and my post on teen alcohol abuse.
Alcohol Facts
  • Teens who start drinking before the age of 15 are five times more likely to be dependent on alcohol than those who started drinking at the age of 21.  Delaying consumption of alcohol can make a significant impact on alcohol dependence.
  • Out of teens surveyed in 2006, 7.2 million reported binge drinking and 2.4 million reported being heavy drinkers. Binge drinking (National Institute of Alcohol and Addition) is defined by drinking five or more drinks in a two hour period. In the blog post, Kids Don't Need to Practice Drinking for College, the author tackles the belief by parents that kids have to practice drinking for college.  Binge drinking does not start in college; however, it intensifies when parental boundaries are removed.
  • When teens drink, they tend to consume alcohol more intensely than adults. For example, teens will consume at least four to five drinks at one time (whoa!) compared to adults who tend to consume four to five within 2 hours when binge drinking.
  • Although teen drinking has decreased in recent years, binge drinking has increased among adolescents. In fact, teens are engaging in extreme binging or drinking up to ten or more drinks in a row. 
  •  Alcohol can cause alterations to the brain structure and function which may have effects into adulthood. An ABC News Report on Girl Binge Drinking describes the dangers of binge drinking on the female brain. Researchers found that girls who drink alcohol have more chances of experiencing brain damage than male teens.
- See more at: http://forhighschoolcounselors.blogspot.com/2015/03/extreme-teen-binge-drinking.html#sthash.ABQOgeeG.dpuf
Alcohol Facts
  • Teens who start drinking before the age of 15 are five times more likely to be dependent on alcohol than those who started drinking at the age of 21.  Delaying consumption of alcohol can make a significant impact on alcohol dependence.
  • Out of teens surveyed in 2006, 7.2 million reported binge drinking and 2.4 million reported being heavy drinkers. Binge drinking (National Institute of Alcohol and Addition) is defined by drinking five or more drinks in a two hour period. In the blog post, Kids Don't Need to Practice Drinking for College, the author tackles the belief by parents that kids have to practice drinking for college.  Binge drinking does not start in college; however, it intensifies when parental boundaries are removed.
  • When teens drink, they tend to consume alcohol more intensely than adults. For example, teens will consume at least four to five drinks at one time (whoa!) compared to adults who tend to consume four to five within 2 hours when binge drinking.
  • Although teen drinking has decreased in recent years, binge drinking has increased among adolescents. In fact, teens are engaging in extreme binging or drinking up to ten or more drinks in a row. 
  •  Alcohol can cause alterations to the brain structure and function which may have effects into adulthood. An ABC News Report on Girl Binge Drinking describes the dangers of binge drinking on the female brain. Researchers found that girls who drink alcohol have more chances of experiencing brain damage than male teens.
- See more at: http://forhighschoolcounselors.blogspot.com/2015/03/extreme-teen-binge-drinking.html#sthash.ABQOgeeG.dpuf

Articles
How Kids Smuggle Booze Under Your Nose
 
Assessment
Self Test for Teens

Facts 
Alcohol Facts
  • Teens who start drinking before the age of 15 are five times more likely to be dependent on alcohol than those who started drinking at the age of 21.  Delaying consumption of alcohol can make a significant impact on alcohol dependence.
  • Out of teens surveyed in 2006, 7.2 million reported binge drinking and 2.4 million reported being heavy drinkers. Binge drinking (National Institute of Alcohol and Addition) is defined by drinking five or more drinks in a two hour period. In the blog post, Kids Don't Need to Practice Drinking for College, the author tackles the belief by parents that kids have to practice drinking for college.  Binge drinking does not start in college; however, it intensifies when parental boundaries are removed.
  • When teens drink, they tend to consume alcohol more intensely than adults. For example, teens will consume at least four to five drinks at one time (whoa!) compared to adults who tend to consume four to five within 2 hours when binge drinking.
  • Although teen drinking has decreased in recent years, binge drinking has increased among adolescents. In fact, teens are engaging in extreme binging or drinking up to ten or more drinks in a row. 
  •  Alcohol can cause alterations to the brain structure and function which may have effects into adulthood. An ABC News Report on Girl Binge Drinking describes the dangers of binge drinking on the female brain. Researchers found that girls who drink alcohol have more chances of experiencing brain damage than male teens.
- See more at: http://forhighschoolcounselors.blogspot.com/2015/03/extreme-teen-binge-drinking.html#sthash.ABQOgeeG.dpuf
Alcohol Facts
  • Teens who start drinking before the age of 15 are five times more likely to be dependent on alcohol than those who started drinking at the age of 21.  Delaying consumption of alcohol can make a significant impact on alcohol dependence.
  • Out of teens surveyed in 2006, 7.2 million reported binge drinking and 2.4 million reported being heavy drinkers. Binge drinking (National Institute of Alcohol and Addition) is defined by drinking five or more drinks in a two hour period. In the blog post, Kids Don't Need to Practice Drinking for College, the author tackles the belief by parents that kids have to practice drinking for college.  Binge drinking does not start in college; however, it intensifies when parental boundaries are removed.
  • When teens drink, they tend to consume alcohol more intensely than adults. For example, teens will consume at least four to five drinks at one time (whoa!) compared to adults who tend to consume four to five within 2 hours when binge drinking.
  • Although teen drinking has decreased in recent years, binge drinking has increased among adolescents. In fact, teens are engaging in extreme binging or drinking up to ten or more drinks in a row. 
  •  Alcohol can cause alterations to the brain structure and function which may have effects into adulthood. An ABC News Report on Girl Binge Drinking describes the dangers of binge drinking on the female brain. Researchers found that girls who drink alcohol have more chances of experiencing brain damage than male teens.
- See more at: http://forhighschoolcounselors.blogspot.com/2015/03/extreme-teen-binge-drinking.html#sthash.ABQOgeeG.dpuf
Alcohol Facts
  • Teens who start drinking before the age of 15 are five times more likely to be dependent on alcohol than those who started drinking at the age of 21.  Delaying consumption of alcohol can make a significant impact on alcohol dependence.
  • Out of teens surveyed in 2006, 7.2 million reported binge drinking and 2.4 million reported being heavy drinkers. Binge drinking (National Institute of Alcohol and Addition) is defined by drinking five or more drinks in a two hour period. In the blog post, Kids Don't Need to Practice Drinking for College, the author tackles the belief by parents that kids have to practice drinking for college.  Binge drinking does not start in college; however, it intensifies when parental boundaries are removed.
  • When teens drink, they tend to consume alcohol more intensely than adults. For example, teens will consume at least four to five drinks at one time (whoa!) compared to adults who tend to consume four to five within 2 hours when binge drinking.
  • Although teen drinking has decreased in recent years, binge drinking has increased among adolescents. In fact, teens are engaging in extreme binging or drinking up to ten or more drinks in a row. 
  •  Alcohol can cause alterations to the brain structure and function which may have effects into adulthood. An ABC News Report on Girl Binge Drinking describes the dangers of binge drinking on the female brain. Researchers found that girls who drink alcohol have more chances of experiencing brain damage than male teens.
- See more at: http://forhighschoolcounselors.blogspot.com/2015/03/extreme-teen-binge-drinking.html#sthash.ABQOgeeG.dpuf
Alcohol Facts
  • Teens who start drinking before the age of 15 are five times more likely to be dependent on alcohol than those who started drinking at the age of 21.  Delaying consumption of alcohol can make a significant impact on alcohol dependence.
  • Out of teens surveyed in 2006, 7.2 million reported binge drinking and 2.4 million reported being heavy drinkers. Binge drinking (National Institute of Alcohol and Addition) is defined by drinking five or more drinks in a two hour period. In the blog post, Kids Don't Need to Practice Drinking for College, the author tackles the belief by parents that kids have to practice drinking for college.  Binge drinking does not start in college; however, it intensifies when parental boundaries are removed.
  • When teens drink, they tend to consume alcohol more intensely than adults. For example, teens will consume at least four to five drinks at one time (whoa!) compared to adults who tend to consume four to five within 2 hours when binge drinking.
  • Although teen drinking has decreased in recent years, binge drinking has increased among adolescents. In fact, teens are engaging in extreme binging or drinking up to ten or more drinks in a row. 
  •  Alcohol can cause alterations to the brain structure and function which may have effects into adulthood. An ABC News Report on Girl Binge Drinking describes the dangers of binge drinking on the female brain. Researchers found that girls who drink alcohol have more chances of experiencing brain damage than male teens.
- See more at: http://forhighschoolcounselors.blogspot.com/2015/03/extreme-teen-binge-drinking.html#sthash.ABQOgeeG.dpuf
Alcohol Facts
  • Teens who start drinking before the age of 15 are five times more likely to be dependent on alcohol than those who started drinking at the age of 21.  Delaying consumption of alcohol can make a significant impact on alcohol dependence.
  • Out of teens surveyed in 2006, 7.2 million reported binge drinking and 2.4 million reported being heavy drinkers. Binge drinking (National Institute of Alcohol and Addition) is defined by drinking five or more drinks in a two hour period. In the blog post, Kids Don't Need to Practice Drinking for College, the author tackles the belief by parents that kids have to practice drinking for college.  Binge drinking does not start in college; however, it intensifies when parental boundaries are removed.
  • When teens drink, they tend to consume alcohol more intensely than adults. For example, teens will consume at least four to five drinks at one time (whoa!) compared to adults who tend to consume four to five within 2 hours when binge drinking.
  • Although teen drinking has decreased in recent years, binge drinking has increased among adolescents. In fact, teens are engaging in extreme binging or drinking up to ten or more drinks in a row. 
  •  Alcohol can cause alterations to the brain structure and function which may have effects into adulthood. An ABC News Report on Girl Binge Drinking describes the dangers of binge drinking on the female brain. Researchers found that girls who drink alcohol have more chances of experiencing brain damage than male teens.
- See more at: http://forhighschoolcounselors.blogspot.com/2015/03/extreme-teen-binge-drinking.html#sthash.ABQOgeeG.dpuf
Facts About Alcohol
Alcohol Energy Drinks
Binge Drinking Fact Sheets
Effects of Alcohol

Free Activities
Drug Free Activities
Free Alcoholic Booklet

Spring Break and the Dangers of Alcohol 
Spring Breaks Biggest Danger: Binge Drinking
Spring Break Safety Tips

Want to know more?  See my posts on teens and alcohol abuse. 

Purple Drank: Guide for School Counselors 











 Extreme Teen Binge Drinking













Day of Silence

April 15, 2016

Official website for Day of Silence.


The Day of Silence (DOS) is a student led event to stand against bullying and harassment for LQBTQ students in schools.  The first event was held at the University in VA in 1996.  

The key for participation for students is to communicate with teachers ahead of time and let them know they will communicate in writing. 

Facts About the Day of Silence
Day of Silence Poster
Day of Silence Ideas
DOS Pledge
Tips When Facing Opposition from Administration
Speaking Cards

Safe Prom and Graduation Awareness

SADD Prom/Graduation Activities

Some Ideas Before Prom Night...

  • Have elementary students write notes to high school students reminding them not to drink and drive on prom night.


  • Have flower shops hang a sign in their window asking students to stay sober.

Safe Prom Events


Safe and Sober Prom
Post Prom
After Prom

Tips:
Safety Tips for the CDC


Sexual Assault Awareness Month

Resources

National Sexual Violence Resource Center
Sexual Assault Awareness Toolkit
Safer Campus
What is Campus Sexual Violence?
Becoming an Agent of Social Change-Youth Guide
Stopping Harassment at School
What is Healthy Sexuality and Consent?
Preventing Acquaintance Rape-Guide for Teens
Surviving Acquaintance Rape

Circle of 6 Phone App - Although developed for college students, think about adapting the Circle of 6 App for your high school students.  Great idea for teens to have before Spring Break and/or prom.  The phone app allows a teen to text your friends in the case of emergency and asks them to come and get him or her.

See my blog on tips for the school counselor and sexual assault. 













Youth Violence Awareness 

April 4-8, 2016 

Each year, Students Against Violence Everywhere sponsors a Youth Violence Awareness Week.  This year's events include:

April 4th- Promote Tolerance and Respect
April 5th- Manage Your Anger
April 6th- Solve Conflicts
April 7th- Support Safety
April 8th- Unite in Action

Youth Violence Training by Stryve

The three modules cover the following information:

1.  Understanding Youth Violence
2.  The Public Health Approach
3.  Creating Your Youth Violence Plan

Preventing Youth Violence Opportunities for Action
Staring a Peace Club
SAVE: Youth Violence Awareness Activities  

Action Plan 

SAVE Action Plan 

Bullying

10 Ways To Be an Upstander
International Bullying Prevention Association -Free resources
Free bullying course from Bullying.org
National Bullying Awareness Month Resources
School Bullying
Stopbullying.gov

Dating Violence

Dating Violence - Dating violence training for educators.

Electronic Aggression

Podcast 

Sexual Assault and Rape

Sexual Assault Prevention

Sex Trafficking

Human Trafficking Awareness Training
Recognizing the Signs of Human Trafficking
Understanding Sex Trafficking

Suicide

Suicide Prevention Resource Center - free online training
Youth Suicide Prevention Program

See my posts on youth violence awareness.

Youth Violence Chat: Cyberbullying 









Resources and Activities for Youth: Youth Violence Awareness